Suppose your stock of children too large; and that, by your care for their support, you should be abridged of some of your own luxuries and pleasures. To make away with the troublesome and expensive brats, I allow, would be the desireable thing: but the question is, how to effect this without subjecting yourself to that punishment which the law has thought proper to affix to such sort of jokes. Whipping and starving, with some caution, might do the business: but, since a late execution for a fact of that kind might have given a precedent for the magistrates to examine into such affairs, you may, by these means, find your way to the gallows, if you are low enough for such a scrutiny into your conduct: and, if you are too high to have your actions punished, you may possibly be a little ill spoken of amongst your acquaintance. I think, therefore, it is best not to venture, either your neck, or your reputation, by such a proceeding; especially as you may effect the thing, full as well, by following the directions I have given, of holding no restraint over them.

Suffer them to climb, without contradiction, to heights from whence they may break their necks: let them eat every thing they like, and at all times; not refusing them the richest meats, and highest sawces, with as great a variety as possible; because even excess in one dish of plain meat cannot, as I have been told by physicians, do much harm. Suffer them to stay up as late as they please at night, and make hearty meat-suppers; and even in the middle of the night, if they call for it, don’t refuse the poor things some victuals. By this means, nobody can say you starve your children: and if they should chance to die of a surfeit, or of an ill habit of body contracted from such a diet, so far will you be from censure, that your name will be recorded for a kind and indulgent parent.

Jane Collier, The Art of Ingeniously Tormenting.
These my rules - which positively forbid, not only all manual correction, but every the least degree of restraint or contradiction, to the infant’s wayward will, if you intend to breed them up properly, so as to be a torment to themselves if they live, and a plague to all your acquaintances.
Jane Collier, The Art of Ingeniously Tormenting.
If you have no children, keep dumb animals enough, and they will pretty near answer all your purposes.
Jane Collier, The Art of Ingeniously Tormenting.
But let us suppose the patience of your miserable object quite exhausted, and that she is worked into a proper indifference about pleasing you; so that you should find that she minded very little what you said to her; only (considering yours as a profitable place) that she was resolved to bear all your tricks, for the sake of your money; then part with her directly, and get another: for all the pleasure of Tormenting is lost, as soon as your subject is become insensible to your strokes.
Jane Collier, The Art of Ingeniously Tormenting.
If you happen to have a very good cook, you must strictly enquire into her temper; and if you find her a termagant (as most cooks are, according to Ben. Johnson’s observation), you must give up all hopes of plaguing her. You must then find your enjoyment in the good dinners she dresses for you, and the use she will be of to oppress the other servants. If she should happen to be ever so good a cook, and should happen to be good-tempered, you must not let her ‘scape you, but must always send her down word, that your dinner was not eatable. It is true indeed, that, by this means, you may make her leave her place, and you may lose a good servant: but you are no true lover of the noble game of Tormenting, if a good dinner, or any other convenience or enjoyment, can give you half the pleasure, as the teazing and mortifying a good industrious servant, who has done her very best to please you.
Jane Collier, The Art of Ingeniously Tormenting.
There are no people in the world so little suited to war as ours. Their light-headedness and impatience with the slightest difficulties are two characteristics which to my great regret only go to prove this. Although Caesar said that the Franks had mastered two techniques, the art of war and the art of talking, I must confess that up to now I have been unable to comprehend upon what basis he assigned the first of these attributes to them, since patience in work and suffering, indispensable traits in warfare, are found only rarely in them.
Armand du Plessis, Cardinal Richelieu, The Political Testament of Cardinal Richelieu (tr. H.B. Hill 1961), Book 2, Chapter 9.
There are many men whose ignorance is so great that they consider it is sufficient to correct a given evil by forbidding its repetition. But such a view is so much in error that I can say with certainty that in such circumstances new laws are less remedies for public disorder than evidence pointing to the malady and proving the weakness of the government. It only indicates that if the old laws had been enforced there would have been no need either to renew them or to enact others in order to prevent new disorders which never would have occurred if a greater severity had been employed in punishing the misdeeds originally committed.
Armand du Plessis, Cardinal Richelieu, The Political Testament of Cardinal Richelieu (tr. H.B. Hill 1961), Book 2, Chapter 5.
Experience teaches those who have had long practice in this world that men easily lose the memory of rewards and, when they are heaped with them, they expect even more, and become both ambitious and ungrateful at the same time. This teaches us to realise that punishments are a surer means of holding a person to his duty, since people are less likely to forget what has made an impression on their emotions. This is more persuasive for most men than reason, which has little power over many minds.
Armand du Plessis, Cardinal Richelieu, The Political Testament of Cardinal Richelieu (tr. H.B. Hill 1961), Book 2, Chapter 5.
Even when one fails in honestly trying to do his duty the disgrace should make him happy, while contrariwise, if success comes to him accidentally when not abiding by what he is obligated to by honour and conscience, he should be considered most unfortunate since he can draw no satisfaction from it equal to the real losses arising from the knowledge of the means which he has employed.
Armand du Plessis, Cardinal Richelieu, The Political Testament of Cardinal Richelieu (tr. H.B. Hill 1961), Book 2, Chapter 2.
Authority constrains obedience, but reason captivates it. It is much more expedient to lead men by means which imperceptibly win their wills than, as is more the practice, by those which coerce them.
Armand du Plessis, Cardinal Richelieu, The Political Testament of Cardinal Richelieu (tr. H.B. Hill 1961), Book 2, Chapter 2.